Definition

One must make a distinction however: when dragged into prominence by half poets, the result is not poetry, nor till the autocrats among us can be “literalists of the imagination”—above insolence and triviality and can present for inspection, imaginary gardens with real toads in them, shall we have it.

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Awhape me!


Hello all...tis The Scibbler here for a second edition of 'Scribble It.'

What better beginning for a plethora of poets than a multitude of wordageables?

Experts at the University of York have complied a list of 30 words from the English language that have fallen out of our consciousness and conversation that might conceivably make a comeback.

What better place to put that to the test than The Imaginary Garden? Here are those very words and their meaning.

Ambodexter: One who takes bribes from both sides.
Betrump: To deceive, cheat; to elude, slip from ( I know right?)
Coney-catch: To swindle, cheat, to trick, dup, deceive
Hugger-mugger: Concealment, secrecy
Nickum:  A cheating or dishonest person
Quacksalver: A person who dishonestly claims knowledge of or skill in medicine, a pedlar of false cures.
Rouker: A person who whipers or murmurs, who spreads tales or rumours
Man-millinery: Suggestive of male vanity or pomposity
Parget: To daub or plaster the face or body with powder or paint
Snout-fair:Having a fair countenance; fair-faced, comely, handsome
Slug-a-bed: One who lies long in bed through laziness
Losenger: A false flatterer, a lying rascal, a deceiver
Momist: A person who habitually finds fault. a harsh critic
Peacockize: To behave like a peacock; esp. to pose or strut ostentatiously
Percher: A person who aspires to a higher rank or status; an ambitious or self-assertive person
Rouzy-bouzy: Boisterously drunk
Ruff: To swagger, bluster, domineer. To ruff it out/ to brag or boast of a thing
Sillytonian: A silly or gullible person, esp. one considered as belonging to a notional sect of such people
Wlonk: Proud, haughty/Rich, splendid, fine, magnificent: in later use esp. as a conventional epithet in alliterative verse ( N. A fair or beautiful one)
Fumish: Inclined to fume, hot-tempered, irascible, passionate; also charectorised by or exhibiting anger or irascibility
Awhape: To amaze, stupefy with fear, confound utterly
Hugge: To shudder, shrink, shiver, or shake with fear or with cold
Merry-go-sorry: A mixture of joy and sorrow
Stomaching: Full of maalignity; given to cherish anger or resentment
Swerk: To be or become dark; in Old English often, to become gloomy, troubled or sad
Teen: To vex, irritate, annoy, anger, enrage/ To inflict suffering upon; to afflict, harass; to injure, harm
Tremblable: Causing dread or horror; dreadful
Wasteheart: Used to express grief, pity, regret, disappointment or concern: 'alas!' 'woe is me!' Also a wasteheart-a day, wasteheart of me
Dowsable: Applied generically to a sweetheart, 'lady-love'
Ear-rent: The figurative cost to a person of listening to trivial or incessant talk


So the task ahead is clear. Pick one or two or a dozen of those words and pen a poem. Not inspired by them? OK! Do your own research and find words that we do not currently employ in conversation and put them into a poem instead. Link the words to their meaning if you would.

I look forward to reading your revivalist tomes. Link up below and please visit each other and comment. We all love a visit.


Tuesday, October 17, 2017

The Tuesday Platform

Hello poets and poetry lovers. I am slowly getting into the Halloween mood now that the weather in the Northeast USA has taken on a decided crispness. In that spirit, I'd like to share one of my favorite ghost stories in musical form.

  The Highwayman sang by Loreena McKennit, original poem/ lyrics by Alfred Noyes

You all know the drill. Share a piece of poetry as the spirit moves you, new or an old favorite. Take a little time to hop around the pond and see how the poetic spirit moves through the rest of our denizens. If you like something, don't keep it to yourself. Conversation and constructive feedback in the comments section is always welcome.